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RDO INTEGRATED CONTROLS BLOG - November, 2017


5 Reasons Drone Focus Should Be On Your Radar

5 Reasons Drone Focus Should Be On Your Radar

The third-annual Drone Focus Conference is May 31-June 1 in Fargo, North Dakota. Organized by Emerging Prairie, a nonprofit organization in Fargo, this all-drones event is all about the latest in the UAS industry. 

For the third year, RDO Integrated Controls is participating in a big way, both as a supporter and as part of the curriculum.

If your near-future goals include implementing drone technology into your business, expanding your UAS knowledge, or connecting with other drone enthusiasts, here are 5 reasons Drone Focus is an event you won’t want to miss.

Speaker Lineup
Drone Focus includes a lineup of speakers who are experts in all areas of UAS. Notable speakers include Senator (R-ND) John Hoeven, Nicholas Flom of Northern Plains UAS Test Site, and Ed Waggoner of NASA.

Student Pitches
Hear ideas about the future of UAS from the future of UAS. Students are invited to form a team and create a project, the only criteria that it must be an innovation in the drone or unmanned systems industry. Each team will present its idea with a 3-5 minute pitch, and participate in a Q&A session with judges. The program is designed and led by Innovation Fellows at North Dakota State University’s Research and Tech Park.

Live-Action Drones
As with any conference, some of the most valuable learning is gained outside of the seminars. Drone Focus 2017 will feature Drone Focus Fest, an afternoon of drone races, autonomous vehicle and tractor shows, and new consumer product launches.

Part 107 Training Course
Those interested in obtaining Part 107 Remote Pilot Certification are invited to attend a special one-day course designed to help in preparation for the Unmanned Aircraft General (UAG) written exam. The course takes place May 30 at the Fargo Jet Center and a UAG written exam will be offered on June 2. Learn more about Part 107

Visit Fargo
The rumors are true and word’s getting out – Fargo is a pretty cool city. Not only has North Dakota gained national notoriety as a leader in UAS technology and business implementation, the city of Fargo is home of the original “Drone Focus Meetup” a monthly gathering where educators and students, drone professionals and enthusiasts meet and discuss regulations, technology, and business opportunities for drones. It was these meetups that evolved into the first full-day Drone Focus event in 2015.

Visit the Drone Focus event page to learn more about the event and purchase your tickets.

Interested in learning more about drones for business applications? Contact the team from RDO Integrated Controls.

 

April 13, 2017  |  Category:

6 Ways Drones Deliver on Construction Jobsites and Off

6 Ways Drones Deliver on Construction Jobsites and Off

Many in the construction industry are discovering UAV technology as game-changers in numerous aspects of their work, from survey and mapping applications to jobsite safety to marketing.

Thanks to recent changes to FAA Part 107 rules for flying drones, UAV technology is more accessible and realistic than ever. Add the fact that manufacturers are offering drones designed specifically for construction applications and it opens up the opportunities to professionals at every level, in both the public and private sector.

For example, senseFly’s eBee RTK drone is designed as a survey-grade mapping drone. The fixed-wing unit is compatible with most base stations and can provide accuracy down to 3 cm with no need for ground control points. Featuring a copter design, the senseFly albris drone has five dual-sensor modules. These provide the situational awareness required to operate the drone in close proximity to structures, making it ideal for building and bridge inspections. It also offers a major advantage in its ability to switch between capturing video, still, and thermal imagery, all during the same flight.  

From onsite, day-to-day tasks to behind-the-scenes business opportunities, here are the primary ways drones are delivering for construction professionals.  

In the Dirt
Construction sites, whether roadbuilding, bridge inspection, or general builds, all can benefit from the use of UAV technology. When used properly, three key deliverables are achieved on the jobsite.

1. Accuracy
Drones capture data at very high density, often millimeters per pixel. By comparison, traditional staking survey methods using Lidar and GIS typically collect data points anywhere from 10 to 20 feet; sometimes greater gaps exist due to vegetation or other factors that make an area inaccessible to pedestrian or vehicle traffic.

Because drones capture this 3D data in a spatial or geo info set, they produce highly accurate 3D recreations of just about anything on the ground, from a pile of dirt to a full building under construction.

So what does this mean on the jobsite? Imagine a site prep project with hundreds of cubic yards of dirt that needs to be moved. The exact location, height and width of each dirt pile is exact, so a worker can see exactly how much dirt needs to be moved, and precisely estimate trucks, manpower, and time.

2. Productivity
Hand-in-hand with the accuracy they provide is the productivity offered by UAS technology. Wasted effort and resources are minimized.

Consider traditional surveying. With drones, data can be gathered at a rate that makes conventional methods seem antiquated. As fast as the operator can walk, pause, press a key to record, then move along, data can be collected.

Drones also deliver data fast, enabling management to make changes and adjustments as soon as possible.

3. Safety
Perhaps the most important benefit drones bring to the jobsite is greatly increased safety.

Bridge inspection is a primary example of just how impactful a drone can be. Conventional bridge inspection methods suspend a worker under or alongside a bridge – dangerous in any situation, but especially depending on the size, location and usage of the bridge while the inspection takes place.

Even a simple surveying project can put workers in danger. An icy winter jobsite is full of slip-and-fall hazards for workers walking the area, where a drone can be used by an operator, safely and comfortably offsite.


In the Business
It’s hard to argue with the accuracy, productivity and safety benefits that drones bring to the jobsite. And there’s another side of a construction business that benefits – the activities that often go unseen to most but have a big time impact on the bottom line.

1. Asset Tracking
The high-quality photography offered by drones and the ability for them to oversee large areas in a short amount of time is making it easier to track assets on the jobsite – both equipment and workers.

In addition to sheer tracking, this can also help determine if current assets are adequate or if additional resources are needed on a jobsite.

2. Stakeholder Communication
It’s not always possible for major investors and other stakeholders to regularly visit a jobsite and see progress updates. Thanks to their ability to take quality photos and video, drones provide a valuable tool for frequent stakeholder communication.

The drone can be set to run the same flight plan once every week to capture precise developments and changes on a jobsite, keeping updates consistent from week to week. Furthermore, images can be time-stamped for precise accuracy. Whether the full site or specific sections, and from site prep to final completion, drone images and video offer the opportunity to communicate progress, visually. 

3. Future Marketing
There’s no better way for a business to market itself than showing its capabilities. The dynamic images offered by drones can show a fully-finished project, and from angles that are more impressive and that offer a more thorough look than on-the-ground photographs.

An automated flight plan can be set to take a ton of photos, from the start of the job all the way through completion.


When the most accurate, highest-level information is desired, drones are a viable option for every construction project.

Interested in how to integrate a drone on your jobsite to deliver benefits including better accuracy, greater productivity, and enhanced safety? RDO Integrated Controls can help, and is offering special rates and a one-year warranty on its loaner/demo fleet of albris drones. Contact the team at RDO Integrated Controls to find out more.

See complete UAV products, and learn more about service and support offered from RDO Integrated Controls.

 

March 29, 2017  |  Category:

What You Want to Know About FAA Part 107 and Drones

What You Want to Know About FAA Part 107 and Drones

On June 21, 2016, the FAA announced that Part 107 Rules for UAS (Drone) Operations in the National Airspace had been finalized.

The new rules went into effect on August 29, 2016, opening a door for many potential pilots interested in commercial activities using UAVs. With the new rules, there are many opportunities for the use of UAVs in agriculture, civil engineering, aggregate, and mining industries. It will now be easier for companies to become compliant to fly commercial UAVs.

Here are highlights and updates from the Part 107 ruling since it was originally announced:

Getting the Part 107 Remote Pilot Certification for non-FAA Pilots

  • To become certified you simply need to take and pass a 60-question Knowledge Test at an FAA testing center with a minimum score of 70%. There is no flight test required to obtain your Remote Pilot Certificate.
  • The FAA has several online resources, including a study guide, the actual ruling known as 14 CFR Part 107, and many other information manuals.
  • RDO Integrated Controls offers a regulatory training package to help you prepare for your Part 107 exam and comply with federal regulations when operating your UAV.
  • After the exam, all information is submitted through the FAAs Integrated Airman Certification and Rating Application (IACRA), where they conduct a background investigation, evaluate your test score, and either approve or deny the application.

Getting Part 107 Remote Pilot Certification for current FAA Pilots

  • Part 61 Pilots are not required to take the Knowledge Test at a testing center, but must complete an online training course, called "Part 107 small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) ALC-451"
  • Current pilots then need to complete and submit Form 8710-13 (FAA Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application for a remote pilot certificate).

Current 333 Exemption Holders

  • Your FAA Pilot must complete the online Remote Pilot Certification training online before the implementation of Part 107.
  • Your 333 Exemption is still valid per the time period stated on it.

Pending 333 Exemptions

  • You will be notified by the FAA that you are in one of three tiers and be given options to continue or transfer to Part 107

FAA Approval

  • You will be required to be approved and vetted by the FAA through its IACRA system before being issued your Remote Pilot Certificate. This process can take several months to complete because of the amount of time required to complete a background investigation, evaluate your application and test scores, and officially approve your request.

What are the final rules?

  • A summary and a complete overview of the final rules, known as 14 CFR Part 107, are available on the FAA website.

Bring UAV Technology to the Jobsite
The team at RDO Integrated Controls is offering special rates and a one-year warranty on select drones from its loaner/demo fleet. Contact the team at RDO Integrated Controls to find out more about complete UAV products available or to learn more about our exclusive FAA Compliance package, including best practices, tips, and training on topics related to FAA compliance.

This blog was originally posted on June 21, 2016 and updated March 15, 2017.

 

March 15, 2017  |  Category:

An Ever-Changing UAV Industry and its Customers

An Ever-Changing UAV Industry and its Customers

Not long ago, UAVs were a new technology – admired by many and successfully used by few. Fast forward to today, drones have found their way onto numerous jobsites, and are successfully being used for numerous applications. However, the story doesn’t end here. In fact, the story of UAV technology on the jobsite likely won’t ever end; instead, it will continue to grow, change, and evolve.

Because of this, RDO Equipment Co. and RDO Integrated Controls have continued to make significant moves in the UAV space. Our teams strive to make the technology and products accessible to more customers, and have expanded offerings to provide more choices.

The agriculture industry has been a major focus, with the additions of the senseFly eBee SQ and Sentera DJI Phantom drones. Another major area of focus is the construction industry, particularly, using UAV technology for surveying and mapping.

Last year, RDO Integrated Controls expanded its UAV offerings with the addition of the new senseFly albris drone. One of the albris’ biggest advantages is its ability to switch between capturing video, still, and thermal imagery, all during the same flight.

The team at RDO Integrated Controls is also offering the senseFly eBee RTK drone. Designed to be a survey-grade mapping drone, the eBee RTK is compatible with most base stations and can provide accuracy down to 3 cm with no need for ground control points.

Meeting the changing needs of customers and an ever-evolving product line doesn’t come without foresight. And looking ahead, our team sees surveying and mapping as major areas of potential for integration of drones on construction jobsites.

For those interested in putting UAV technology to work on the jobsite, RDO Integrated Controls is offering special rates and a one-year warranty on its loaner/demo fleet of albris drones. Contact the team at RDO Integrated Controls to find out more.

See complete UAV products, and learn more about service and support offered from RDO Integrated Controls.

This blog was originally posted on January 5, 2017 and updated March 1, 2017.

 

March 2, 2017  |  Category: UAV

Your Ultimate Guide to CONEXPO – CON/AGG 2017

Your Ultimate Guide to CONEXPO – CON/AGG 2017

It comes only once every three years and takes the construction industry by storm. CONEXPO – CON/AGG is March 7-11 in Las Vegas and we’re looking forward to the opportunity to connect with customers and manufacturing partners, meet new professionals, and learn about new challenges, solutions, and opportunities for our industry.

With more than 2,500 exhibitors showcasing the latest innovations in equipment, products, and services, plus 150 educational seminars, it’s no wonder the country’s biggest construction show sees attendees from nearly all segments of the industry – and also why exhibitors plan their show strategy months, sometimes years, in advance.

We’re here to help you plan your show experience and ensure you get the most value out of attending CONEXPO – CON/AGG, with expert advice from three veteran attendees:

Josh Price, General Manager, RDO Integrated Controls
Mark Rieckhoff, Sales Manager, RDO Vermeer
Will Risinger, Sales Manager, RDO Equipment Co.

From optimizing your time to what you can expect from our manufacturing partners, here are our teams Top 10 tips for making your CONEXPO – CON/AGG experience a success.


1. Plan of Attack
CONEXPO is among the biggest tradeshows in the world. Especially for first-time attendees, the miles of booths, products, companies, and events can be overwhelming. All our experts suggest taking the time to plan out a show strategy.

“This is too large a show to just ‘hope’ you have time to see it all,” Rieckhoff says. He suggests reviewing the CONEXPO – CON/AGG interactive exhibitor maps to help plan a route.


2. Prioritize
Closely tied to planning a show strategy, a key piece in scheduling time is to prioritize it. 

Price suggests taking the time to write down your goals for the show, “What companies you want to visit, what products you want to see, and any seminars or events you need to attend,” then planning time accordingly to ensure you can fit it all in.


3. Account for More Than Booths
Remember, this show is large – as you plan your time, don’t forget to account for walking to and from the show, and between booths and exhibit halls.

Risinger recommends taking advantage of the Las Vegas Monorail to and from the convention center, saying, “It’s the fastest way to get back and forth.”

On the flip side, keep in mind the additional hours you can allocate for business and pleasure. Breakfasts, lunches, and dinners are great opportunities for quick networking, more in-depth meetings with companies, or just enjoying downtime with other attendees.


4. Spread it Around
Speaking of exhibit halls, there are several. North Hall. South Hall. Outdoor Lots. CONEXPO – CON/AGG isn’t limited to one area; rather, it’s comprised of several indoor and outdoor areas.

“It’s easy to get caught up in everything and realize you’ve spent half your day in one hall,” cautions Price.

Rieckhoff agrees and recommends dedicating time to each hall in the overall show strategy, saying, “Split up your time by halls and days.”


5. Ask, Talk, Engage
Whether the goal is to learn or network, Price says one of the simplest pieces of advice he’d give to attendees is to talk.

“It’s amazing how many people stop by a booth and don’t ask questions or engage in conversation,” he says. “As someone who has spent time in the booth, I can tell you we’re eager and excited to talk to attendees! So don’t be hesitant to ask questions or just strike up a conversation.”


6. Watch and Listen
Risinger counters Price’s advice on being an active participant at booths with a reminder of the value of observing, specifically, your competitors.

“Spend some time around the competition watching and listening,” he advises. “You’ll take away better understanding of what your competition is telling customers about themselves and maybe even about you.”


7. Hidden Gems
Price refers to some of the smaller, lesser-known companies as hidden gems – and ones you’ll want to find.

“There are a lot of really small companies doing some really amazing things,” he said. “Even if what they’re doing might not apply to your business, it’s just a great opportunity to see different innovations and unique things other companies are offering.”


8. Get Social
Don’t forget to bring business cards. Yes, you’ll have your badge scanned at every booth and companies will be able to reach out to you after the show. But Risinger notes that most people still carry a few business cards and it’s never a bad idea to be prepared for the exchange.

Price agrees, and offers additional insight into why business cards are still tradeshow networking gold, saying, “If I get your business card, I have the opportunity to connect with you later that night or the next day during some downtime,” he explains.

Just as important the value of the tried-and-true business card, Price adds that making connections can go beyond the show floor.

“Several of our employees leverage social media, especially Twitter and LinkedIn, to engage with customers before the show, meet up at the show, and stay connected after,” he said, adding that attendees can follow the same practice to connect with companies and others involved in the show.


9. Take Small Bites and Chew
Rieckhoff’s biggest piece of advice comes in the form of an expression: Attending CONEXPO – CON/AGG is like eating an elephant. How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time.

“What I mean is, don’t feel like you have to try to tackle the whole show at once,” he says. “Split up your trip over the days, stick to your plan, and you’ll be better able to enjoy your time.”

Risinger agrees, saying, “Pace yourself during the week. Most people have more than one day to visit the show so take your time and enjoy seeing all it has to offer.”

“And, it’s Vegas so it has to be said, don’t overdo it on late-night activities the first night,” Price cautions, with a laugh.


10. RDO Equipment Co. Partners
The RDO team is fortunate to work with the best manufacturers in the industry, three of which will be strongly represented at the show. Below, our team offers a quick sneak peek into what you can expect to see, learn, and discuss when you visit the John Deere, Topcon, and Vermeer booths.

John Deere Innovations
Visit the John Deere / Hitachi Construction booth in the North Hall, N12525. In addition to 38 machines and nearly 300 experts ready to discuss and highlight the latest construction technology, the John Deere booth includes a special Tech Experience area.

Risinger says he’s excited about the technology piece at John Deere’s booth, saying, “You’ll want to spend a lot of time here. This will be a focal point this year and there will be several takeaways you can bring back and implement in your business.”

Topcon Teaser
There’s sure to be a mix of new products and unique solutions to see at Topcon’s booth in the North Hall, N12702.

“Topcon always releases a new product at CONEXPO,” Price said. “The team keeps a tight lid on it so we can’t say what it is, but know something exciting is coming.”

In addition to the unveiling of something new, Price says attendees are sure to see at least one or two products at the Topcon booth they won’t see anywhere else.

“You can go to a lot of booths and see the same stuff but there’s going to be some unique offerings at Topcon’s.” Price noted paving products like the RDM1 and RDMC Smooth Ride, and mast-less dozers as examples of unique draws.

Vermeer Value
Stop by the Vermeer booth in the Central Hall, C3-C5, booth C32627. Items on display include Vermeer Productivity Tools, Rock Lab, and many new products including the D10X15S3 HDD Directional Drill, the R250C Reclaimer, and a special treat: a look at Vermeer’s newest Horizontal Grinder.

“Vermeer’s booth will provide the opportunity to learn more about technology and on-the-jobsite product improvements,” Rieckhoff says. “We’re looking forward to showing attendees how to better control costs, improve profits, and enhance overall jobsite management.”


On behalf of the entire RDO Equipment Co. team, we wish you a successful CONEXPO – CON/AGG show. We hope to connect with, catch up with, and see many of you March 7 through 11 in sunny Las Vegas.

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About the Author
Jessi Zenker is Communications Specialist for RDO Equipment Co. based in Fargo, ND. Connect with her at the show or beforehand on Twitter @RDOJessi.

To learn more about equipment, parts, and service for your business, contact your local RDO Equipment Co. store.

 

February 14, 2017  |  Category:

Why Now is the Time for Annual Equipment Service

Why Now is the Time for Annual Equipment Service

It’s almost time to take the field. We’re nearing kick-off. Management is making the final roster moves to assemble a winning line-up. That’s right; it’s time for the big game.

No, not that big game. The kick-off to spring is nearly here. For surveyors, contractors, and all those in the equipment industry, it means machines and workers are about to take the field. With jobsites busy as ever, your fleet needs to be ready for hard work and long hours – is it up to the task?

Annual, thorough service is among the best ways to ensure your GPS, machine control, and other equipment is in prime form for the season ahead. And just like the athletes getting in prime condition to take the field on Sunday, it’s also essential your team stays sharp and up-to-speed on technology and opportunities that could allow them to do their jobs better, faster, and more economically.

We all know the value of quality pre-season preparation. But what if your company just doesn’t have the time or proper resources to dedicate this level of focus to the team and fleet’s health? Consider your trusted dealership.

RDO Integrated Controls offers an annual service program for equipment including Carlson Machine Control, Sokkia, and Topcon, as well as special opportunities for annual training and technology upgrades.

Because your line-up is just as important as the ones that will be on both sides of the field at NRG Stadium this weekend, here are three reasons why annual service now is the key to a winning work season in 2017. 


MVPs
For something as important as your team and fleet’s health, don’t trust it to anyone but professionals. Leading dealerships employ certified technicians, and dedicated product and technology specialists who are experts in equipment and systems, and can ensure they’re working properly, calibrated, and software is up-to-date.

Additionally, these highly-skilled team members have a keen ability to “see” what others can’t. Like the best, most intuitive defensive players, they draw on experience and patterns to offer a proactive vs. reactive approach.

Those untrained or inexperienced in equipment maintenance and technology may have the best of intentions, but can easily miss warning signs and crucial points, or perform system upgrades incorrectly.


Detailed Playbook
The best dealerships provide an exceptional, in-depth level of detail when it comes to servicing machines, often including testing cords and connectors, and cleaning system components.

This attention to detail extends beyond machines and systems, as most dealerships keep precise, thorough service records. While the immediate benefit is simple peace of mind, the long-term payoff comes in multiple forms.

For example, detailed records can be compared to records of other, similar machines to identify patterns or uncommon issues. All of this can help with troubleshooting or proactive suggestions down the road.


On-Field Elements
A good equipment manager has all the essentials on game day – from cleats to jerseys to snacks – ready to go for the team. Likewise, major dealerships keep a substantial inventory of batteries, cables, and other parts. Add in relationships with major manufacturers and, often, a network of their own stores, they also have the ability to source unique or uncommon parts and deliver them fast. This keeps downtime minimal and ensures every customer gets the exact part needed.


Calling the Right Play
Just as coaches on the sidelines manage the clock and make the most of each quarter, the best managers know the right call to make at each crucial point in the asset management game. Key to every equipment offense is to avoid being blitzed by unexpected downtime and repairs when the busy spring season is underway. Before winter ends, make the right play call and schedule service and training at your trusted, local equipment dealership.

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About The Author
Jason Kreps is Product Specialist Manager for RDO Equipment Co. and based in Moorhead, MN.

See current winter service specials offered in your area.  For more information or to schedule your winter service, call or visit your local RDO Integrated Controls store.

 

February 1, 2017  |  Category:

5 Benefits of Snow Plow Lasers

5 Benefits of Snow Plow Lasers

From Atlanta to Alaska, Portland to Pennsylvania, it seems as though nearly every inch of the country is being blanketed with snow this winter. For snow removal professionals on the East Coast and in the Midwest, this isn’t something new. Moving the white stuff is a frequent occurrence that begins as early as October and can last into spring. However, for several areas of the country, snow plowing is a whole new game.

Regardless of the frequency you plow snow and how much experience you have, every snow plow operator has the same goals and they all boil down to doing the job right. This includes plowing snow efficiently, with minimal property and equipment damage, and above all else, maintaining safety.

Snow plow lasers have emerged as a great tool for every snow plow professional, from beginner to veteran. By using new technology, snow plow lasers have the ability to help drivers see their wing plow trailing edge location. The GL3000PMC Guidance Laser is one which uses an ultra-bright laser spot to establish the trailing edge location.

From better vision to enabling quick adjustments to versatility, here are five reasons a snow plow laser might be the next tool you’ll want in the toolbox.


1. Safety First
When it comes to any jobsite enhancement, it’s hard to find a stronger argument than safety. A snow plow laser establishes a wing or tow plow’s trailing edge location before the driver arrives at that point. This provides a two-fold benefit in that the operator’s visibility is enhanced by the bright laser, plus he or she has the opportunity to adjust course quickly and proactively. Not only does this make roads safer for nearby pedestrians, it helps the operator avoid hitting objects, cars, curbs, or other obstacles for reduced damage to both the equipment and other’s property.


2. Savings Next
Speaking of reduction in damages, the GL3000PMC has been shown to reduce plow strikes by 80% or more. The dollar savings of minimizing both property and equipment damage really add up quickly.

Additionally, the enhanced efficiency of plowing provided with a laser delivers better results, faster, saving both time and resources.


3. Guiding the Way
There are times when a plow operator is working on the road, after a storm. But more often than not, he or she is out there working in the middle of it – blizzards, freezing rain, sleet, and all. Because a laser helps show the pathway of the plow, it’s much easier for the operator to do a thorough job versus when vision is compromised.

This benefit is also huge for those who live in areas that don’t often see snow or those who are new to the task of plowing. The laser helps show drivers the pathway of the plow, allowing them to regularly see and learn the path, and enabling better operation for plow novices.


4. Faster and Cleaner
While the amount of cities that have seen snow this winter is alarming, perhaps more notable is the large dumpings of snow that have come at a time – from a few inches to a foot or more within just a couple of hours. To keep up and try to stay ahead of the continuously falling snow, plow operators need to work faster and clear snow better – both of which can be done with the help of a snow plow laser.

The enhanced visibility of the plow pathway takes the guesswork out of driving, giving operators a clear and more efficient path to plow. This leads to faster plowing and less time spent re-plowing to clean areas missed by the first pass.

5. Versatility
For many plowing professionals, snow business isn’t their only business. The GL3000PMC is a versatile laser that’s designed for both hot and cold weather. This allows it to be used for other applications, such as highway, pavement, and field striping. Virtually any vehicle or heavy equipment, for example, asphalt distributors, needing line control and guidance can benefit from a snow plow laser. 

Whether you live in the south or north, Washington or Wisconsin, if you operate a snow plow, you’ve got an important job to do. Ensure it’s done right, done quickly, and done safely with the help of a snow plow laser.

Get more info on the GL3000PMC snow plow laser. Or contact the RDO Integrated Controls team to find out how to implement a snow plow laser into your business.

 

January 17, 2017  |  Category:

An Evolving UAV Industry – and Customer

An Evolving UAV Industry – and Customer

Not long ago, UAVs were a new technology – admired by many and successfully used by few. Fast forward to today, and drones have found their way onto numerous jobsites, and are successfully being used for numerous applications. However, the story doesn’t end here. In fact, the story of UAV technology on the jobsite likely won’t ever end; instead, it will continue to grow, change, and evolve.

Because of this, RDO Equipment Co. has continued to make significant moves in the UAV space. Our team strives to make the technology and products accessible to more customers, expand offerings to provide more choices, and ensure we’re supporting software solutions that provide more opportunities for our customers to easily manage and use their data. One particular area of focus has been agriculture.

Late last year, RDO Equipment Co. expanded its UAV offerings when it announced its new partnership with Sentera, a UAV-focused company offering image and data solutions for drones. The highlight of this announcement was the addition of the DJI Phantom drone, a quad-copter unit, available at select RDO Equipment Co. stores throughout the country. Read the full news release or watch the video to learn more about the Sentera partnership and products.

Starting this month, RDO Equipment Co. is further expanding UAV offerings by adding to the current lineup of senseFly units to include the new eBee SQ, a drone specifically designed for agriculture. This improved fixed-wing hand-launched drone is capable of 400 acres per flight and carries the popular new Sequoia multispectral sensor. The eBee SQ is capable of infrared and visual spectrum crop inspections simultaneously, and is now available at select RDO Equipment Co. and RDO Integrated Controls stores in all regions. For more info about the senseFly eBee SQ, watch this video.

Meeting the changing needs of customers and an ever-evolving product line doesn’t come without foresight. Looking ahead, the RDO precision agriculture team has five predictions as to what the future holds in UAV technology for farmers.

1. Field Analysis
Continued advancement in field analysis, such as the ability to measure soil characteristics, will allow farmers to make effecting planting and in-season decisions.

2. Water Management
UAV technology has already begun to see use in water management applications, including identifying areas of water stress. Continued growth in this area will offer more in-depth analysis to help with major operational components like precise irrigation scheduling.

3. Crop Health
Evaluating crop health is likely where UAVs will see the most use. Advancements in imaging and analysis will allow growers to identify, assess, and address various crop health issues.

4. Application Technology
While application technology in larger drones is available now, the ability in smaller UAVs is still a few years away. Working prototype systems in development are larger than most existing agriculture drones, which require additional certification to operate.

5. Automated Equipment
In the future, UAV technology will also likely become more integrated with other autonomous equipment. Imagine the efficiency that could be achieved by integrating fully autonomous drones with autonomous tractor technology.

While some of these advancements are likely still a few years from realization, there’s still a lot happening with UAV technology in the present that can significantly impact your business and bottom line. Contact the team at your nearest RDO Equipment Co. or RDO Integrated Controls store to find out more about UAV technology and how it can enhance your current farming operation.


Get more info on precision agriculture offerings from RDO Equipment Co.

See complete UAV products, and learn more about service and support offered from RDO Integrated Controls.

 

January 5, 2017  |  Category:

Leap Second - What, Why?

Leap Second - What, Why?

As you celebrate the end of 2016 and the clock counts down this year New Year’s Eve – you’ll need to add one more second. International Earth Rotation and Reference System Service (ERS) announced there will be an extra second added to the end of this year, so clocks will read 23:59:60 on December 31, 2016. These leap seconds are occasionally needed to ensure Coordinated University Time (UTC), the official measure of time, stays in sync with changes in the Earth’s rotation.

Universal Time
UTC or Universal Coordinated Time is the combination of Universal Time (UT1) and International Atomic Time (TAI – in French – Time Atomic International – The Standards Bureau is in Paris, France).

UT1 (Universal Time), also known as Astronomical Time - is the time it takes for the Earth to rotate on its own axis. It is easy to come to the conclusion that the Earth’s rotation is constant. However, it actually fluctuates slightly due to a variety of reasons such as wind, the friction of tidal currents flowing along the bottom of the oceans, ocean currents in general, and the motions of the Earth’s fluid core. Currently, the length of a day is about 2 milliseconds (two one-thousandths of a second [0.002 of a sec or 2 milliseconds] in 200 years) longer than it was in the early 1800’s.

Who or what cares? GNSS systems care about UTC - because they use timing to calculate position.

The UT1 part of the UTC solution loses about 2 seconds per 1000 days in relation to the TAI.

International Atomic Time (TAI) is the second element of the UTC. TAI is the output of 200 highly precise [0.000000001 seconds – (known as a nanosecond) per day] atomic clocks worldwide. These clocks are very precise, even more precise than the rotation time of the earth.

To keep the UTC within 0.9 seconds of the UT1 - leap seconds are periodically added to the UTC. There have been 25 leap seconds added to the UTC since the current system began in 1972. They are applied on either June 30th or December 31st.

What does this mean for TOPCON GNSS Users?
Several of these leap seconds have occurred since Topcon has been utilizing GNSS for positioning solutions. Currently, Topcon has firmware upgrades available for the current GNSS receivers. However, many of the older units will not get a firmware upgrade for the upcoming leap second.

How will this affect your operation?

  1. It may cause you to have to clear the NVRAM on January 1st.
  2. It might take a bit longer to initialize.
  3. There might be a few older receivers that this leap second will cause to become inoperable.

It is hard to predict since there is a very precise oscillator (clock) on the GNSS boards that uses the UTC time signal from the satellites. If this oscillator, or clock, is close to the limits - then this one-second change could push it over the limit of functionality. If so, your system will not be able to initialize.

Our Solutions Center and team of experts are available to answer any questions you may have related to the leap second. Contact us via email or phone (877-90-RDOIC).

 

December 22, 2016  |  Category:

From the Ground Up to Scaling Up

From the Ground Up to Scaling Up

A dozen individuals from 10 states in industries spanning general construction to roadbuilding, mining to emergency response, engineering, and surveying – what could they possibly all have in common?

On October 13 and 14, at a rural farm site near Billings, Montana, this group of professionals came together to participate in an event focused on one popular topic: Drones.

Led by the team from RDO Integrated Controls, 12 seasoned drone experts, across numerous industries, gathered to be part of a unique event and pioneering experiment in the drone world. An event and experiment devised from simple conversations between Sean Erickson, Technology Support Specialist with RDO Integrated Controls, and a few of his customers, drone leaders in their respective fields.

Setting the Scene
RDO Integrated Controls sells and supports senseFly, a leading UAV manufacturer, and its eBee and albris drones. With the level of expertise and leadership it provides to professionals interested in UAV technology, RDO Integrated Controls makes it a mission to have a knowledgeable team dedicated to this area, as well as resources customers need to successfully implement drones in their businesses.

Erickson had received a request from a customer to create a “how-to” type document based on drone applications. After thinking about it and discussing the concept with a few veteran drone customers, Erickson had a spin-off idea.

“Instead of creating a document with info, tips, and best practices, I started thinking, what if we held an event that would bring together drone experts across different industries to talk about applications, discuss ideas, and share knowledge,” he said.

Erickson began pitching the idea to experienced drone customers, particularly those with hundreds of flights under their belts. As interest grew and discussions continued, ideas started snowballing. One idea, in particular, became the basis on which the entire drone event would be based.

eBee to the 10th
“I knew there were cases of companies putting multiple drones in the air at one time,” Erickson said. “But I hadn’t seen a fully-coordinated drone mapping mission with multiple aircraft.”

Theoretically, Erickson was certain a planned multi-drone mission would work. And he felt the event would be an opportunity to put his theory to the test.

“At first, we thought about trying to fly two drones simultaneously,” Erickson said. Some customers were already doing this regularly so he then thought about going for five. Then, Erickson said, the thought was, “If we can do five, why not go for 10?”

Furthermore, 10 was an easy number to show scale and thus, 10 eBees flying simultaneously became the final goal for the event.

An event that had shaped up as an opportunity to prove Erickson’s original theory.

An event that had several drone professionals eager to take part in this first-time experiment.

An event, which became known as the eBee to the 10th, that was about to come to life.

Bringing It All Together
Day one of the eBee10 was focused on discussions about all-things in UAV industry including field gear, Part 107 testing, and data processing. Every attendee brought a unique topic to present, a format Erickson devised as a way to steer clear of lecture-style learning and instead encourage discussions and sharing of knowledge between attendees.

It was on the morning of day two that the experimental mission was scheduled. But before the group could head out into the field and test Erickson’s theory, the flight plan had to be finalized.

“Late on Thursday night I, my colleague, Dennis Louton, and two of our attendees, Dennis Ryan of Vertical Sciences, Inc., and Jordan Kessel of Baranko Brothers, Inc., created the flight plan,” Erickson said. They continued work into the early morning hours, testing the plan in the simulator and tweaking it until they had the final, working flight plan.

The following morning, Erickson and Ryan presented the plan to the team, at which time Erickson said he gave all attendees the chance to withdraw from the experiment.

“I knew what we were doing was unprecedented,” he said. “If, after seeing the plan and simulation, anyone felt it was too risky, I wanted them to have the opportunity to bow out.” Instead, the group was more excited than ever, and at 9 a.m. they headed to the site.

The test site was a private farmstead with 125 acres of mapped flight area. Erickson arranged permission to use the site while Dennis Ryan, as air boss, filed the Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) as well as notified the local air tower of all details related to the test, including closing out the NOTAM when the mission was complete.

The launching and landing was done in two groups of five drones. After the first group launched, the second was launched a few seconds later, and all 10 were in the air simultaneously performing a single mapping mission, and controlled by a unified Ground Control Station. Five pilots were responsible for launching, landing, and observation, while five controlled the flight plan via onsite computers. Erickson was onsite safety office and Louton served as logistics officer, providing equipment and technology support. Radio communications kept the pilots in touch with each other and the local air tower.

The result? The eBee drones flew the flight plan, which covered 125 acres in seven minutes.

“It was quick and effective,” Erickson said of the experiment. “We showed that 10 drones could execute a flight plan simultaneously.”

Assessing Impact
While Erickson’s experiment proved what he originally set out to do, it also demonstrated another important concept: scalability. He explained, “To see 10 drones cover 125 acres in just seven minutes, shows that it’s possible to cover 1,000 acres in one hour. That’s huge.”

Generally speaking, a single UAV can map about 100 acres per hour. Substantial, for example, when comparing the time spent for a crop scout to walk fields or a crew to survey a jobsite. But to show the significance of the scalable opportunity provided by multiple drones, Erickson used an example of an emergency response scenario.

Hurricane Katrina was the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history. Imagine a disaster of such magnitude today. It would require a full-scale emergency response plan, which could include UAV technology; for example, searching for survivors using heat-mapping capabilities of drones.

See below to see the scalability opportunity with drones in this scenario:

640:                Acres in a Square Mile
170:               Square Miles (Land) of the city of New Orleans
108,800:        Acres in the city of New Orleans

1,088:            Approx. hours it would take one UAV to map the city
45:                 Approx. days it would take one UAV to map the city (assuming 24-hour days)
108:              Approx. days it would take one UAV to map the city (assuming realistic 10-hour days; daylight)

108:              Approx. hours it would take 10 UAVs to map the city
4.5:               Approx. days it would take 10 UAVs to map the city (assuming 24-hour days)
10:                Approx. days it would take 10 UAVs to map the city (assuming realistic 10-hour days; daylight)

It’s easy to see the potential impact of a multi-drone flight in this type of scenario.

And certainly this shows possibilities for companies of all sizes to grow with the ability to get more done, faster, using multiple drones. But, Erickson also took into consideration the hidden value in these results. How could this info apply to construction, roadbuilding, or engineering companies not necessarily looking to grow or interested in trying to operate multiple drones?

One example he noted was in partnerships between companies saying, “A construction company, an engineering firm, and a surveyor could team up for a project that they, individually, may not have been able to do.” This co-op model he describes would enable small companies to win projects against larger, full-service companies, potentially opening the doors to new clients and diversification of services.

Next Steps
While the event has ended, Erickson says his and his colleagues’ work is far from over. As he has begun analyzing the flight data from the eBee10, he has already found some areas that could be improved – likely, in the eBee10: Version 2.

“Yes, we definitely plan to hold another event like this,” an enthusiastic Erickson said.

Until that date, Erickson has stayed in touch with all engaged customers via a MeetUp website. Both eBee10 attendees and customers who were interested but unable to make it to the event have access to the site, designed with Erickson’s original goal in mind – to bring together drone experts to talk about applications, discuss ideas, and share knowledge.

To say UAV technology is affecting the world is an understatement. Across numerous industries, drones are making work safer, faster, and more accurate than ever imaginable. As knowledge continues to grow, so too will the possibilities – and opportunities.

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For more information on drones for use in agriculture, construction, and other industries, contact the team at RDO Integrated Controls.

 

December 14, 2016  |  Category:

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